Two main features - Print timeline & add duration to task, still not even a basic feature after 6 years!

Hi all,

I’ve recently come to back to bring Asana another go as I like the UI. I hoped to bringing a 150+ team onto the platform, but I am shocked that the Asana team has still not made exporting the timeline into a PDF and adding a duration a basic feature since I last used the app 6 years ago. Come on! these are entry level basic features!

I do not think a screenshot or using another’s platform (Instagantt) is good enough for a PM platform in the current market. Also, manually changing durations for 200+ tasks is very upsetting, its been a basic feature in a gantt charts for decades.

Has anyone else come across these issues or am I missing something?

@Lucas_Wilkinson It’s there in the Gantt View:

1 Like

@Lucas_Wilkinson

  1. Gantt is available using the + icon at the end of the view tabs (or whatever you call them:

1 Like

As @Tom_Huntford mentioned, durations and more are available in the newish Gantt view:

Thanks,

Larry

1 Like

Hi @Lucas_Wilkinson, thanks for sharing your feedback. We have already implemented solutions to the requests you are sharing here!

As shared by @Tom_Huntford and @lpb, durations and more powerfull features are available in Gantt view. And instead of printing a view that can easily get outdated, you can now share a view-only link of timeline, list, calendar and board views with stakeholders outside of Asana. Read-only links dynamically reflect the latest updates on projects and provide a living source of truth for all cross-functional teams and external users as well.

If you are interested in learning about what we have launched in the past couple of years, you can see all community requests that have been implemented in the :rocket: Features Launched and News categories.

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questios :slight_smile:

1 Like

@Lucas_Wilkinson

  1. Bring up the Gantt View
  2. Use the ellipsis (…) at the far right, click “Dependency management options”. These settings are critical to managing the project timeline:
    a. Maintain Buffer. This locks the entire project, including overlaps and delays. Using this, you can move an entire project out or in. And you can move everything after a certain Task when you either drag the task or make it longer.
    b. Consume Buffer. Here, you can move things, but buffers will expand but not contract. This can produce unexpected results–such as everything move when you move out, but nothing moves when you move up, because the “buffers” are “not consume”, that is, they are lengthened.
    c. None. Use this when you want to shift tasks around without other tasks getting moved.
    d. Use these settings as you work with the project–don’t just set one and forget it. Each of them are needed at different points in managing projects. Play around with them and get a feel…

Below you can see a single Task being lengthened, and the entire project moves, maintaining the “buffer” overlaps and delays. You can lengthen a task using either dragging the bar, or changing the Duration, or (upper-right) changing dates in the Task Detail.

Note the VERY COOL fact that ALL the Start Dates of the Tasks move when you move them in the Gantt.

One additional note. When you originally set up the project, I recommend this process:

  1. Set up all the Tasks in List View, using a sortable WBS number at the beginning (because List View likes to sort by Name). Like 101010 Project Kickoff, 101020 Preliminary Planning, 201010 Software Installation, etc. Leave room between initial WBS numbers, 10 at least for every level!!
  2. Avoid Sub-tasks. They disappear by default in the various views. Make everything a Task, and establish the “sub” relationship using the Gantt and your WBS numbering.
  3. Make a simple %Complete or Status field that is color coded (to color the Gantt. You can see in the above screenshots you can tell which tasks are complete (dark grey), which are in process (pink to blue), and which are not started (red). Makes an excellent at-a-glance overview of the project!
  4. Go to the Gantt. Make your initial sketch of the project either with no dependencies at first, or with Dependency Management to Off.
  5. Once your project sketch is set up, enter the dependencies (drag-n-drop is the easiest), then set Dependency Management to “Maintain Buffer”.

Away you go!

I agree the read-only view is great, but some way still want a printed/PDF timeline. They should vote here:

Asana can’t include every feature request, so we’ll all be disappointed sometimes, but hopefully pleased generally!

Thanks,

Larry

This topic was automatically closed 7 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.