Quick Asana structuring tip for your non-profit

Hey everyone, my name is Jeremy and as a Certified Pro, I have begun to help several non-profits in my area move from the chaotic world of e-mail and text message, to organizing in Asana
This no only clear up the communication issues, but also provides a detailed legacy for whom ever takes the reins in the future of the organization
Here is a quick example of some Asana teams that can fit multiple organizations:
Capture
Keep in mind that Projects can exsist within multiple teams when taking a cross-functional approach to tackle a large project
Hope this proves helpful and have a great day!

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Hi @Jeremy_Angus!

I think this tip is a great insight into the different ways that you’re able to leverage the idea of a “Team” that exists outside of the traditional perspective of what a team represent (like a single department). A team is simply a space in Asana where projects are stored.

When adopting Asana and customizing how you’re planning on using it for your organization, you should decide on a set of conventions across your org, which your peers & colleagues align with.

Conventions will adjust and evolve over time, but it’s helpful to establish some “rules of the game”, per se. Some examples can be create a project when you need a place to hold more than 5-10 Tasks for initiative. Ideally a team should be created when a need exists to hold 10 to 20 (or more) projects in a single space that serves as a repository for that group’s work.

Key cross-functional collaborative initiatives, like the ones @Jeremy_Angus pointed out in his screenshot, is the committee framework for how teams can be used. Your “Tech/Website Committee” is going to made up of folks from across many different parts of your organization internally: Web development, Design, Marketing and User Experience, among others. This is a perfect example of where an Asana team does not fit within a traditional “single” department framework, but rather a space where a consortium of stakeholders can to collaborate, either publicly or in private.

Great tip Jeremy; thanks for sharing!

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