Custom, user-facing, auto-generated task IDs


#1

We use Asana for software development. It works great overall, however we have one issue: to refer to tasks from commit messages, we currently need to use Asana’s task IDs - and we copy them from the task’s URL. Not pretty. Also, we are concerned that at some point, the way Asana manages task IDs will change, thus rendering previously created references to tasks useless.

What would help us greatly would be a feature that

  • allows us to set a task ID “template” for each project (e.g. “HR-#”);
  • automatically generates task IDs for tasks created in such a project (“HR-1”, “HR-2” etc.);
  • displays these IDs with the rest of the task’s information.

Benefits:

  • no more copying of task IDs from the URL;
  • task IDs feel more permanent;
  • task IDs can contain information on which project they belong to and are therefore less opaque.

Tasks need a short ID for quick recognition
#2

This is sort of related to the request at Short task link with ID. Short IDs would be extremely useful. Here’s a comment I made about this in the other thread:

This would be exceptionally useful, and the lack of this feature is making Asana difficult to use. If we want to talk about a task we can’t refer to it as “hey, did you work on 668839374825240/707209820347285?” in conversation or refer to that in comments or emails and have anyone know what we’re talking about. Even when we’re trying to link or reference tasks WITHIN Asana it’s hard to do so using the @ notation because there’s no way to easily refer to tasks. The summary of a lot of tasks can be similar, and you only see the first few words of each one, so it’s difficult to reference them through @ notation correctly when the first couple of words match.

I don’t really care if the URL is what it currently is (though short links would be nice) but just having SOME auto-generated, user-friendly identifier would be a huge help. YouTrack does this really nicely by assigning a serial number to each item along with a project abbreviation (which you come up with yourself). For example, if we had a Marketo integration project which we abbreviate as MKTO each ticket which is created would have a user-friendly ID of MKTO-1, MKTO-2, MKTO-3, etc. automatically generated as tickets are created. You can then use @notation to refer to tickets using these values, such as as “What is the status of @MKTO-2?” which would link to the MKTO-2 ticket.

It would be very helpful if we could do something similar in Asana, giving each project an abbreviation and then having tickets be assigned a serial number for the project they are created in (even if they’re added to a different project later) so that we can @reference them easily.


#3

I completely agree with the above comments. My team and I use Asana to capture and issue non-conformities in a manufacturing process. The printed lists are required for us to use, because it is not possible to get everyone we are issuing non-conformities to on-board with Asana (or any software including email). We are still in an era where many people are afraid of technology (and afraid of assuming responsibility). Back to the point, the printed lists are pretty well formatted, but the issue comes after we’ve completed an item and the new list is printed, there is no longer a number identifier for us to use as a reference. We often have to export the list to excel so we can better present the list in an easy to follow way for the project managers, but again the number identifiers that get captured by the excel export are ridiculously long and become ignored because of their size. I like the idea of David Nahodyl that suggests starting the identifier with an abbreviation of the project name, and then chronologically order the number of the tasks starting from -1. The lack of this feature, I have found, creates a lack of desire for my counterparts to want to deal with managing the issues on my lists I give them… and ohhhh do they complain about it. Please Asana team, give us a solution for auto generated Short Task ID’s. Pllllllllease!